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deletedJul 1, 2023·edited Jul 1, 2023
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Jul 1, 2023·edited Jul 1, 2023

What's happening this week is a warning to Europe. Postwar "human rights" bureaucracies and institutions were created for a different time and are now being used by the courts, NGOs and cynical politicians to destroy Europe. They must be changed if democracy in western Europe is to salvage any legitimacy.

Over 4,000 migrants from Africa have arrived in Italy in the last 48 hours. The alleged "far right" government that runs Italy after a landslide election last year during which it promised to block the arrival of illegal immigrants, seems powerless to fulfill its thumping electoral mandate. Matteo Salvini, the deputy prime minister, is currently facing felony charges of "kidnapping" for trying to prevent the landing of boats run by traffickers when he was Interior Minister.

The survival of democracy and of the EU depends on polticians being willing and able to address the grievances of their electorates. Most Europeans want Europe to remain European, but the elite class dismisses them on its utopian-nihilistic crusade to change the West forever.

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Aa Steve Sailer notes with grim bemusement, the rioters have also managed to burn down the Angela Davis primary school in Bezons. (I had to Google that to make sure it wasn't some Babylon Bee-type joke.)

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Jul 1, 2023·edited Jul 1, 2023

With Europeans below replacement birthrate at 1.53 births per woman, the European Union needs mass migration to stabilize the population and provide workers to pay into the welfare state. Europe is only replacing around 75% of its population through reproduction. On average, there are 1.3 million more deaths than births in the EU. In 30 years, the EU will have a population decline of 39 million people at the current rate. That is a 8% reduction in population. The reduction may not seem like much but it is devastating economically because 20 to 50 year olds are the prime spenders in an economy. Mass migration helps solve this this demographic problem. You will see more programs encourage youth around rhe world to live in Europe. Countries like Hungary have tried to implement family friendly measures and they have met with limited success. The LGBTQ and life of Julia lifestyles are to persausive to our youth today and championed in our media as the ideal lifestyles. As a result, we see plummeting birthrates. This will catch up with us all as economies crash.

https://www.ined.fr/en/everything_about_population/data/europe-developed-countries/birth-death-infant-mortality/

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Jul 1, 2023·edited Jul 1, 2023

If France is such a hellscape, why do people from the safe & monoethnic Eastern Europe keep moving to work and live there? Do these people have a desire to die in riots?

I like most of your articles, but this article is too one-dimensional. I am not going to call you out for reading Jean Raspail, but think of it like this. When making a tasty dish, you want to have the meat and potatoes first, and then it is alright to complete the dish by adding some Raspail-flavored spice. By contrast, if you just pour a dish full of Rapail spice, it isn't much of a dish.

The one-dimensional style is more frequent in your Europe articles than your America articles, because I feel you have an broad sense and rich intuition & "feel" for American society. When you write about America, the sense I get is that for you, America is not just culture wars, LGBTQ incidents and Floyd riots, but also a complex, multi-faceted place with an amazing richness of people and stories (& also a deeply felt personal history). I don't get that feeling as much when you write about Europe. Instead, the Europe articles are frequently overly polemical and one-dimensional.

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Some observations. These are Frenchmen who originated from France's extensive colonial empire (later called overseas provinces). Eastern Europe doesn't have a history of overseas colonialization although the Austria Hungarian Empire encompassed many different peoples.

Nowadays most Moslem nations are relatively peaceful and don't have this degree of lawlessness that we're seeing in France. Is it because Moslem nations adhere to some of the principles of Sharia law?

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The yellow vest riots seem to have slipped from memory, but it seems like no one is really ever very happy with the French government.

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Well, that was a cheerful beginning to my morning. But as John of the West noted above, the French seem to always hate their government, which is why rioting is their national sport.

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Notwithstanding that the riots are shocking, you really need some historical context here. Former colonial subjects are not an invading army in France; they've lived there legally and mostly peaceably for many decades. You don't have to read very deeply to discover that, in spite of France's invitation to former colonials to emigrate there starting in the post-WWII period (in which thousands of North Africans, Vietnamese, and other colonials fought in the Free French Army -- i.e. fought for the liberation of a country that exploited them in many ways), French government and society has failed miserably to assimilate them. To blame this entirely on the migrants is not only sensationalist, but also ahistorical. This is not a Camp of the Saints scenario.

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Good comment on Twitter from Alex Kaschuta:

The story of liberal universalism is still believable until something like this happens. Importing a hostile 5th column turns into civil war after a certain threshold, it’s unavoidable.

The faith in universalism is here to blame because:

- It sees a failure to integrate outsiders as a failing of the host nation

- It breeds resentment in the new arrivals through oppression narratives

- It can’t accept that some populations are simply different - in constitution and predilections, and no social programs can change that

The people at the top sincerely believe in universalism because it’s a soothing replacement for Christianity, it distinguishes them from the racist plebs and more importantly, they get to avoid the real life consequences of this belief.

They’re surrounded by +2SD people from all over the world, in “good neighborhoods” with “good schools.”

The reality is that the future belongs to nations that simply will not permit this. Restoring and keeping order, with the chips of liberal universalism falling where they may, will be necessary.

https://twitter.com/kaschuta/status/1675073205889908736?s=46&t=2B0XfsiVZRu8gjN8Ehb8FA

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It looks like the French Empire has decided to bite the French nation in their collective posterior once again just as the British Empire has done with grooming gangs and Britain's occasional riot. What to do? Have the police and army attack the rioters with truncheons and bayonets and arrest as many as rioters as possible. What to do in the long run? Repatriation to Africa with pensions and other payments. Payments to the African countries, from Algeria to Senegal to Mali, to take their people back.

I disagree with our host about Camp of the Saints. Although the novel is turgid and occasionally tedious, it is brilliant in exposing the self-hatred of white leftists. It has been twenty years since I read it but I don't remember it being particularly racist. Growing up in Prince George's County MD inured me to leftist insult words like "racist." PG County is one of the largest "white flight" counties in America. I guess that would make about half of the Maryland Republican Party as "racist."

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When the Floyd riots erupted in 2020 someone sent around a comment by Anthony Esolen in which he recommended a reading of Scheler's 'Ressentiment' as a help in explanation. Time for a reread, methinks.

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What? You mean the rioters are black and brown? I was assured by all the mainstream headlines that they were merely "youths."

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This is also not happening in Canada, which has a huge immigration influx and relatively low ethnic tension. Why?

Canada has a very selective process for admission - picking the wealthy and well-educated, and geography is in its favour: bounded by a friendly yet fairly well-controlled border to the south, by oceans to the east and west, and patrolling polar bears to the north. It is also not a republic, born of revolution; but a constitutional monarchy that offers symbolic balance and counterweight to the vagaries of party politics.

Multiculturalism and integration have been remarkably successful here.

There are problems looming nonetheless. Particularly the housing crisis. There are more people coming in than there are homes for them. Proposed solutions sometimes involve building on our surprisingly limited amount of arable land and on natural habitat. Also, property owners like their wealth, and this is a demotivator for bringing down our absurd housing costs. Real estate is primarily an investment, not a place to live.

The opioid crisis, homelessness, and random mental illness related violence are very much present. There are multiple causes, but the housing crisis certainly contributes.

This kind of largely non-violent displacement and disenfranchisement is a Canadian pattern, going back to when European immigration displaced Indigenous peoples.

Canadian immigration policy can be subtly exploitive of newcomers, from its high tuition for international students to the placement of newcomers in crummy jobs. Many find Canada too expensive, and return home. I sometimes wonder about the brain and money drain from their countries of origin.

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